Adoption and American Ninja Warrior Contestant

By Jordan Upton

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Season 10, episode 8 of American Ninja Warrior aired on July 23, 2018. The Dallas City Finals showcased contestant Katrina Ratcliff, a police officer from Austin, Texas.

In a heartbreaking video about her background, Kat tells the story of losing her father to pancreatic cancer when she was eight years old, and the troubled years with her mom that followed. Her mother had alcohol and drug dependencies and committed suicide when Kat was 15 years old.

When she was 16 yrs. old, Kat met Ellen. They were both working at their small town’s veterinary clinic when Ellen adopted Kat.

“I just felt like she needed somebody, and I felt like it should be me,” Ellen says in the video.

“She started nurturing me and loving me,” Kat says of Ellen. “And gave me the chance to believe in myself. That I was worthy enough to be loved.”

Kat and Ellen illustrate how important it is to offer opportunities to older teens who may have fewer prospects for fostering and adopting. Kat’s life was changed from the love and attention she received after being adopted at 16.

See Kat during the episode: https://www.nbc.com/american-ninja-warrior/video/dallas-city-finals/376613719:15 - 22:45

https://austinpoliceassociation.com/will-of-a-ninja/ https://www.kxan.com/news/local/austin/austin-police-officer-will-compete-on-american-ninja-warrior/994836140

10 Reasons to Bring Your Family to the 7th Annual Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival

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#10 = MUSIC - There are seven groups performing this year! The Alison Brown Quartet; Bobby Hicks, Mark Kuykendall and Asheville Bluegrass; Tim White & Troublesome Hollow; Fireside Collective; The Snyder Family Band; The Trailblazers with Ivy Phillips; and Dwight Hawkins with Brody Hunt. The $15.00 advance ticket price is a great value, and kids under 12 are admitted free. Gates open at 10:00 AM. Opening ceremonies begin at 10:45 AM with the A Cafellas singing the Star Spangled Banner.  The music ends at 6:30 PM. 

#9 = FOR KIDS - There is an abundance of free activities for kids at the Kids’ Activities tent sponsored by AGAPE of North Carolina! The festival volunteers, called Servants, supervise children’s creative play with a variety of arts and crafts and recycled materials. A unique coloring page to save the date for next year, old-fashioned sidewalk games like marbles and jacks and free face painting are also included. 

#8 = FOOD - The festival features many delicious food options. Choices include Southern comfort foods made from scratch at the Dining Hall just behind the Front Porch Stage featuring BBQ, ribs and chicken with all the fixin's; the award-winning Gunny Smitty’s Hot Dog food truck; Carolina Shaved Ice; Baked With Love home-baked desserts; the CBC Coffee Café for hot and cold coffee beverages, and the popular CBC Canteen for the genuine camp snack experience. 

#7 = AUCTION - One-of-a-kind items are available through the exciting and easy online auction, or simply show up at the CBC Hexagazebo in person to bid on your items. The Swicegood Group, a leader in real estate and auctions, manages this activity so all goes smoothly. You can bid on a beach trip, an autographed ukulele, lunch with a patriot, an album collection, a banjo, and much much more.

#6 = SHOPPING - You can shop but don’t drop; just stop where you are! The festival’s vendors include a unique assortment of 20 vendors selling apparel, jewelry, home goods, doggie treats, soaps, artwork, and so much more. Don’t try to buy it all at once; take a break and return to your lawn chair for a musical interlude.

#5 = WEATHER - Don’t sweat the weather. The large professional grade tents will keep you shaded and covered. Historically, the weather on this date has been made to order. And, there are plenty of beverages both iced and hot to keep your body temperature feeling “just right.”

#4 = FAMILY FRIENDLY - This festival is the best family-friendly event in North Carolina. With no alcohol and no smoking, tobacco, or vaping permitted, you can feel good about bringing guests of all ages. Registered nurses staff a  First Aid tent; handicapped parking and assistance is available,  and volunteers called “Servants” work hard to make your festival experience an unforgettable one. Registered guide dogs are allowed.

#3 = PICKER'S PLACE - If you like to pick, then you will feel right at home here with a special pavilion for those folks who want to do more than just watch. Pull up a chair next to some of the best musicians in the world; you never know who you'll meet. 

#2 = ANTIQUE CAR SHOW - That's right. We have cars too! These beauties are located next to the canteen behind the main tent. They are so close to the music that you won't miss a note when you decide to go browse.

#1 = OPEN SEATING - CBC has always used first-come, first-serve, festival style seating. Since there are no assigned seats, you are free to come right down front and set up your chair. (No high-backs please!) Fortunately, there are no bad seats at CBC. All of the grounds provide good views of the stage, and the professional sound team makes sure that every note is crystal clear. 

For more details and to purchase tickets, click here: www.cbcbluegrass.com.

Partnership Made in Heaven

by Lisa Brewer

Lisa Brewer serves as Executive Director of Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival.

For the past two years, AGAPE of NC has sponsored the Kids’ Activities tent at Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival. The event is the nation’s only bluegrass festival held at a Bible camp promoting Bible study and wholesome recreation. In fact, it might just be the most family-friendly festival around. And that works out well for a partnership between CBC and AGAPE.

More than two thousand guests have visited the festival on the second Saturday of September since AGAPE began sponsoring a children’s area. Multi-generational families with members of all ages have enjoyed the best in bluegrass artists, tasty meals, a classic car show, and a variety of free crafts activities. The AGAPE of NC’s Kids’ Activities tent has featured Bible crafts, recyclables for art projects, a Bible coloring page and free face painting. Each year, a “Save the Date” coloring page has been designed by artist and CBC camper, Melea Womack, of the Charlotte area (she doubles as a face painter).

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“Our involvement with Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival began because we wanted to increase our own organization's profile,” said AGAPE of NC ExecutiveDirector, Kimberly Scott. “The festival gave us a very appropriate venue in which to do that. What makes this a great place for AGAPE to be is the audience. Guests who attend this event believe in family values. And if they have not experienced strong families before, we can demonstrate what they look like here.”

The annual bluegrass festival is a fundraiser for the Bible camp’s capital development and scholarship funds. No child has ever been turned away from Carolina Bible Camp due to an inability to pay. In fact, every camper’s fee is kept low and supplemented by the fundraiser.

Performing artists are chosen carefully by the festival committee to ensure family-friendly listening. Alcohol and tobacco products are not permitted at the Camp at any time, including during the festival.

Carolina Bible Camp is situated on sixty-eight wooded acres in Mocksville, NC. Cabins are rustic in design with modern accommodations including heat, air-conditioning, and private bathrooms. A dining hall with commercial grade kitchen comfortably seats 250 at one time. Outdoor activities include walking trails, in-ground pool (open during summer camp weeks only), beach volleyball, jungle gym, disc golf and more. The largest outdoor shelter is a popular gathering spot for a cappella singing during camping weeks.  During the bluegrass festival, it becomes a Pickers’ Place for instrumentalists who want to “jam.” More than 100 volunteers work together to create a memorable family festival experience for guests.

In addition to sponsoring the Kids’ Activities tent, Scott and other AGAPE representatives promoted AGAPE at a separate booth at the bluegrass festival.

“This has given us a means to engage with festival guests directly,” Scott explained. “We have had many special conversations about exploring foster family service and supporting AGAPE’s mission in various ways."

“We believe in the healing qualities of music, fun, and fellowship,” Scott said. “Those activities are so important to families, and they are highlighted at Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival. With Christ as the foundation of the Camp and the foundation of AGAPE, we know we are at the right place to share Christ as the foundation of the family.”

The seventh annual Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival is scheduled for Saturday, September 8, 2018. Performing artists include Grammy winner Alison Brown; acclaimed Bobby Hicks, Mark Kuykendal & Asheville Bluegrass; returning favorite Tim White & Troublesome Hollow; 2017 MerleFest band competition winners The Trailblazers; 2016 MerleFest band competition winners Fireside Collective; the popular Snyder Family Band; and famed pre-war stringband musician Dwight “Sawman” Hawkins. For more information, please contact Lisa Brewer at spchwoman@ aol.com or visit www.cbcbluegrass.com.

Mayor Grateful To Start Family With Adoption

By Jordan Upton

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On May 22nd, the mayor of Washington, D.C., Muriel Bowser, announced that she has adopted a newborn baby. Mayor Bowser, now 45, became the youngest person and only the second woman to serve in the position when she was elected in 2015. In a statement released today, Bowser announced that she began the adoption process last year and it progressed quickly, allowing her to bring her baby home today. Bowser becomes a single mom with this adoption and she is committed to being a great mother as well as a strong leader for her community. “I am thrilled, nervous, and looking forward to each and every stage... I am so grateful to be able to start my family in this wonderful way” Bowser stated.

Adoption has allowed for Mayor Bowser to fulfill her wish of having a family of her own and additionally gives her newborn baby the gift of growing up in a loving, caring, and supportive home. Bowser is an excellent role model for those who wish to start a family and have exhausted other means and are perhaps exploring alternative routes, and is a champion for the adoption process.

Adoption and foster care changes the lives of all involved. It allows for the parent(s) to love and care for a child that needs it tremendously. AGAPE helps foster parents find the children who need them the most. Placing children into safe, caring environments offers them the best opportunity to grow into the strong, resilient, and important people that every child has the potential to be.

Source: https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Family/washingt...

Foster Care Awareness

By Jordan Upton

May is National Foster Care Month. This national month of recognition began in 1988 when President George H. W. Bush issued the proclamation as a way of shining a national spotlight on the foster care system and to help show appreciation for foster parents.

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While there are countless foster parents who work hard to raise foster care awareness in their communities, they do not receive the same national media attention as do celebrities. International movie stars like Angelina Jolie, Hugh Jackman, and Michelle Pfeiffer have all adopted or fostered children in their lives and have spoken publicly about the joy it has brought them in their lives as well as the importance it holds in the lives of the children. Of this group of celebrity foster and adoptive parents is movie star Sandra Bullock, who has adopted two of her children out of the foster care system.

In an interview with InStyle magazine, Bullock discusses the importance of adopting, especially out of the foster care system. Bullock also discourages the use of the phrase “my adopted child”, stating that the word “adopted” is unnecessary. This is an important distinction to make and one that is looked over frequently. There is a stigma place upon fostered or adopted children when using those kinds of terms and it is essential that these children be made to feel loved, cared for, and respected.

While most of us do not have the ability to discuss these topics with international media outlets, we can still work locally to promote fostering and adopting practices. The need for loving and caring foster parents is not contained only to the month of May, but every day, every month, and every year. So please take a little time out of your day to help promote great organizations like AGAPE of N.C. and help us give every child a forever home.

http://www.instyle.com/news/sandra-bullock-june-cover https://www.acf.hhs.gov/cb/faq/foster-care-5

What NBC’s “This Is Us” Gets Right About Foster Care

Following Deja’s storyline and her accurate portrayal of a child in foster care

By Jordan Upton

1. Trash Bags for Travel

When Deja moves between foster homes, you see her carrying only a trash bag. Many children entering foster care do not have things of their own, especially suitcases. They are often provided with just a trash bag to gather what clothing and possessions they will take with them to foster care. There are many programs nationwide attempting to remedy this problem by providing children with backpacks and basic necessities when they enter foster care: AGAPE of NC’s Backpack Blessings; Things of My Very Own; Together We Rise

2. Parental Substance Abuse Problems

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Viewers are told through a social worker that Deja’s mom must successfully complete a rehab program and maintain sobriety at home before Deja can return. This is the reality for a majority of children entering foster care. The Center for Community Partnerships in Child Welfare of the Center for the Study of Social Policy reports that 45 to 88% of cases referred to child protective services have a parental substance abuse problem.

3. Mistreatment from Foster Parents

Deja is placed in a foster home with another girl, Raven. The foster dad frequently beats them, but when discussing the abuse, Raven says, “At least all he does is hit us.” Mistreatment of children in foster care is an issue nationwide, with studies finding that “in Oregon and Washington state ... nearly one third reported being abused by a foster parent or another adult in a foster home.”

4. Siblings are Often Separated

Though in the show Deja and Raven are friends, not siblings, they dreaded being separated. Deja reported the abuse in their previous home, and upon being removed, Raven was distraught that now they would be separated and may face worse obstacles alone. The National Center for Youth Law estimates that “over half of children in foster care nationwide have one or more siblings also in care.” Though studies show the benefits of keeping siblings together, it is often not possible, and some reports indicate that up to 75% of siblings in foster care are separated.

5. Reunification with Family Often Fails

Deja is reunited with her mother, only to later be pulled out of school by her social worker because her mother has been arrested. Deja must re-enter foster care, a common occurrence. Many “case plans” created for parents are overwhelming obstacles to getting their children back. Kevin Norell, a caseworker in Utah, writes that often “many plans are designed for failure.”

In addition to the backpack blessings program, AGAPE of NC also strives to combat these and other issues typically seen in foster care. The staff of AGAPE works closely with potential foster parents, ensuring they are trained and adequately equipped to care for children entering their homes and lives. They maintain contact and are always available as a resource to children and parents. AGAPE makes every effort to keep siblings together when placed in foster care homes and ease their transition as much as possible. It is the mission of AGAPE to provide compassionate Christian outreach and strengthen families one child at a time. 

Women Who Helped Pave The Way

By Jordan Upton

In 1980, the week of March 8th was declared International Women’s History Week by President Jimmy Carter. This historic week was established to honor the great female leaders who fought for the rights of women and for equality for all such as Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, and Sacagawea. This historic week was eventually extended to the entire month of March and new additions of great women who impact our society are written in the history books daily.

AGAPE of N.C. would not be as successful as it is today without the help of some truly inspiring women who helped pave the way for advancements in foster care, adoption, and counseling services. Here are three women who played vital roles in altering the landscapes of these areas for not only women but for everyone involved in them.

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Edna Gladney, born in 1886, was an advocate for children’s rights and the improvement of conditions for disadvantaged children. Edna and her husband helped establish the Texas Children’s Home and Aid Society in 1910 and she would be the superintendent until 1961. The Texas Children’s Home would later be renamed the Gladney Center for Adoption. In 1936, Mrs. Gladney lobbied in Texas for the removal of the word “illegitimate” from children’s birth certificates, removing a long-standing stigma placed on children placed into adoption. Gladney would also successfully campaign for adopted children to receive the same inheritance rights as biological children as well as the recognition of being legally adopted as opposed to the children being “under long-term guardianship”. Edna Gladney fought her entire life for the rights of disadvantaged and adopted children and she radically changed the face of the field.

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Melanie Klein was an influential psychologist who dramatically changed the field of child psychology. Klein, born in 1882 in Austria-Hungary, worked as a peer to Sigmund Freud and was a lead in psychoanalysis theory, becoming the first person to use this kind of therapy with children. Klein’s direct work with children helped disprove some controversial theories some psychologists, like Freud, had of children. Thanks to Klein’s work, we are better equipped to understand the needs and wants, emotionally and mentally, of children in far more ways than we were previous to her groundbreaking work. Not only did Klein alter the face of children’s psychology, but of psychology as a whole.

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Edith Cowan was born in Australia in 1861. Cowan had a turbulent and unpleasant upbringing and because of this, she would dedicate her life to the rights of women and children. Cowan helped establish the Karrakatta Club in Perth, Australia in 1894, making it the first women’s club in the country. This club helped women find their own voices to lobby against the injustices they felt were being perpetrated against women and children. She also helped to form the Women’s Service Guilds in 1909 and was a co-founder of Australia’s National Council of Women. Later, Cowan helped to establish the Children's Protection Society and devoted her time to advocate against children being tried as adults in the court system. Her role dramatically influenced the implementation of children’s courts in Australia, and Cowan would serve on the bench for eighteen years, making her one of the first female Justices of the Peace ever. In addition to her role in the role of children in the judicial system, she also strongly advocated for educational reform in order to advance and emphasize the importance of knowledge in children.

While there are countless other women who have influenced the various areas that AGAPE of N.C. focuses on, these three women deserve to be lauded and showcased. We here at AGAPE we applaud strong and courageous women and are indebted to all who advocate for the rights and equality of all. 

This Is Us: and the Depiction of Foster Care on Television

By Jordan Upton

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NBC’s hit show “This Is Us” brings experiences of adoption and foster care to mainstream audiences. The show has been praised for its accurate portrayal of the issues from many perspectives - adoptive parents, adopted children, foster parents, children in foster care, and the parents whose children are taken from them and placed into foster care.

In the first episode, the viewer is introduced to Jack and Rebecca, who are expecting triplets. When one child is stillborn, the couple finds out that another baby had been surrendered at the hospital that very day. They see it as a sign they are meant to adopt the baby and still have three children, triplets celebrating the same birthday. Viewers follow Jack and Rebecca’s storyline as they become Randall’s adoptive parents. Their trials aren’t sugar-coated for easy consumption, but show “real tensions that exist”, says Jason Weber of the nonprofit Christian Alliance for Orphans. Early on, Rebecca explains her struggles connecting with their adopted son by saying, “I grew the other two inside of me; he feels like a stranger.” The honesty in these scenes draws emotional responses from viewers.

Randall’s storyline as an adopted son doesn’t shy away from his inner struggles between fully accepting and being loyal to his adopted family, and his quest to find his biological family.

In season two, the show begins to tackle experiences of foster care. The show highlights Randall and his wife’s arguments, hesitations, and ultimate decision to foster in a way that reflects real life. Viewers are introduced to their first foster daughter, Deja, and see flashbacks of her story: multiple foster homes, carrying her only belongings from place to place in a trash bag, abuse from former foster parents. These scenes are heartbreaking and even more tragic because of their accuracy. 

Book Recommendation: Succeed Because of What You've Been Through

Rhonda Sciortino is a former foster child who emancipated from the child welfare system at age 16. She started in the insurance industry at 15 and started her own retail insurance agency at age 27. She has started organizations to help people and organizations that help abused children and dysfunctional families. Rhonda went from abandonment, abuse, and poverty to joy, peace, and financial prosperity. Rhonda desires to help others use the adversities in their lives as the stepping stones to their successes in every area of life.

A Home for the Holidays with Josh Groban

aired on CBS 12/19/17

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A HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS WITH JOSH GROBAN features uplifting stories of adoption from foster care and raises awareness of this important social issue. The inspirational stories of these American families are enhanced with performances by some of today's most popular artists. (TV-PG) The show aired on 12/19/17 and we thought too good not to share here for those of you that have not have seen it.

AGAPE of North Carolina's mission is to continue providing safe, stable, loving, Christian homes and services to foster and adoptive children in your community. Support like yours is vital and we are so grateful for your commitment to our mission this past year! If you are interested in learning more or ready to take that next step toward fostering or adoption please contact us at agapeofnc.org/contact-us/. 

Source: http://www.cbs.com/shows/holiday_central/v...

The Biggest Blessing of Them All

by Kristin Chenoweth

award-winning actress and singer Kristin Chenoweth writes for WhoSay about her experience as an adopted child.

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In this article, Kristin gives us a glimpse into her life as an adopted child.  She says "if you’re thinking about adopting a child, remember that it’s a gift you’re getting and it comes with just as much responsibility as if you had your child biologically. On top of that, it’s a beautiful blessing that you were chosen to take care of this child and become his or her parent."  We think you will enjoy this article if you are thinking of adoption, fostering or already adopted. 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kristin-chen...

Kristin Chenoweth On ‘LION’ And Adoption

by Kristin Chenoweth

Emmy and Tony Award-winning actress and singer

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Kristin shares her thoughts and personal story on adoption and the movie "Lion" in this article.  Speaking from the heart she brings a perspective that is honest and refreshing. "It’s hardly a secret that I was adopted as a baby and quite frankly, there’s absolutely no reason it should be. As I’ve grown, I’ve watched the conversation and perceptions about adopted kids and families shift, but nothing has quite captured the truth, both the good and the ugly, of adoption like the film “LION.”"  We recommend this film for adults, please note it has adult themes and is rated PG-13! 

Pageant Winner Turned Advocate

By: Ashley Dior Jefferson, Foster Focus Magazine

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Shelby Jenkins is a beautiful example of success because a couple chose to love.  The story on Shelby, Miss Texas US International, by Foster Focus Magazine is a must read.  Shelby reflects on her struggle with the word "wanted" as many children who are adopted or in foster care do, saying “As I reflect on my story I struggle with the term Wanted- such a strange word to capture the value of a life and so vast the sum of roads to demonstrate the act of wanting. To be clear I was always wanted.” Click the link to read more and for even more on Shelby check out the You Tube Video below.  

Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival Announces Area Ticket Locations

Come home to Carolina Bible Camp.

MOCKSVILLE, NC –  Organizers for the 6th Annual Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival announced statewide locations for purchasing tickets to the September 9 event featuring musical artists Blue Highway, Dom Flemons, Song of the Mountains emcee Tim White and Troublesome Hollow, Fireside Collective, and the Loose Strings Band.

The family-friendly festival is a tobacco free, alcohol-free event. Tickets are $15.00 in advance, $20.00 at the gate. Children under 12 are admitted free with a paying adult. 

Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival is sponsored by Brewer Brewer and Sorel, PLLC, Carolina Hearing Clinic, and the Eye Care Centers of Hickory, Salisbury and Statesville. Media Partners include the Winston-Salem Journal and WBRF-FM. Supporting partners are DavidSon Home Crafters and Sage Garden Care Center. 

Tickets for Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival 2017 are on sale now at cbcbluegrass.com but may also be purchased at the following locations without incurring any service fee:

  • In Catawba County
  • Eye Care Center of Hickory, 1060 Lenoir Rhyne Blvd SE, Hickory, NC 28602; Monday-Friday, 8:00 – 5:30.

 

  • In Davie County
  • Carolina Bible Camp, 1988 Jericho Church Road, Mocksville, 

         NC, 27028; call (336) 492-7802 for hours.

  • Davie Chamber of Commerce, 135 S Salisbury St, Mocksville, NC 27028; Monday-Friday, 9:00 – 5:00. 
  • Sage Garden Care Center, 977 Yadkinville Rd, Mocksville, NC 27028; call (336) 734-9476 for hours. 
  • Century 21 Triad Realty, 854 Valley Rd, Mocksville, NC 27028; call (336) 751-4444 for hours.

 

  • In Forsyth County
  • Carolina Hearing Doctors (two locations)
  • Clemmons – 3780 Clemmons Road, Clemmons, NC, 27012; Monday-Thursday 8:00 – 5:00. Friday 8:00-12:00.
  • Winston-Salem – 3742 Vest Mill Road; Monday-Thursday 8:00 – 5:00. Friday 8:00-12:00.

 

  • In Iredell County
  • Eye Care Center of Statesville, 843 N Center St, Statesville, NC 28625; Monday-Friday, 8:00 – 5:30.

 

  • In Rowan County
  • Eye Care Center of Salisbury, 2120 Statesville Blvd, Salisbury, NC 28147; Monday-Friday, 8:00 – 5:00.

 

  • In Wake County 
  • Brooks Avenue Church of Christ, 700 Brooks Avenue, Raleigh, NC; Monday – Friday 9:00 – 4:00. Call 919-821-2400 for more information.

 

  • In Wilkes County
  • Brewer Brewer & Sorel Attorneys at Law, 204 East Main Street, Wilkesboro, NC28697; Monday through Friday, 8:30 - 5:30.

 

Festival Details

  • Arts & Crafts - A wide range of vendors includes unique jewelry, artisans, a silent auction featuring specialty items, and more. 
  • Pickers’ Place - Musicians will want to bring their instruments to take advantage of the Pickers’ Place jam tent.
  • Classic Car Show – The Piedmont Chapter of the Model A Ford Restorers’ Club’s classic car exhibit is included in the price of admission.
  • Children’s Play - the festival includes the best in outdoor play equipment. Free arts and crafts activities, and old-fashioned sidewalk games for kids of all ages. 
  • Food – BBQ lunch with “all the fixin’s” is served on the grounds for an additional $12.00 per plate; hamburger plates available for $5.00.
  • Hours, Location - the Mocksville, NC festival gates open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 6:30 p.m. Parking is free. Handicapped parking and assistance is available for guests with special needs. No alcohol, no coolers, no pets, please. Bring your own chair.

Contact Information

Carolina Bible Camp is located at 1988 Jericho Church Road in Mocksville, NC, 27028. For more information, please contact CBC Bluegrass Festival Executive Director Lisa Brewer at (336) 262-6325 or visit the website at www.cbcbluegrass.com.  

 

Our Featured Artists for 2017

Voted the “Favorite Bluegrass Artist of All Time” by the readers of Bluegrass Today, Blue Highway has earned 26 collective IBMA Awards, 6 SPBMGA Awards, one Dove Award, and numerous Grammy nominations. They are currently nominated for a 2017 Grammy Award in the category for Best Bluegrass Album for their chart-busting disc, “Original Traditional.” Blue Highway members include Jason Burleson (banjo, vocals), Shawn Lane (mandolin, fiddle, vocals), Gaven Largent (dobro, vocals), Tim Stafford (guitar, vocals), and Wayne Taylor (bass, vocals). Blue Highway will perform on the CBC Front Porch Stage from 4:45 pm until 6:15 p.m. They will close the day with other artists on stage performing “Will the Circle Be Unbroken?”

Arizona native Dom Flemons may be best known as a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, with whom he earned a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Folk Album. Flemons is an author and poet who developed a deep interest in reviving, preserving, and performing old-time music. “I might be playing music that’s 100 years old,” he said, “but that doesn’t mean my ears are only listening to music that’s 100 years old.” Dom Flemons will intrigue, instruct, and delight you with his banjo and more on the CBC Front Porch Stage from 3:00 p.m. until 4:30 p.m.

Everyone’s favorite bluegrass buddy, Tim White, is returning to the CBC Bluegrass Festival for his third year in a row. The talented host of the PBS syndicated television show Song of the Mountains will perform with brothers Donny and Garry Ollis. Tim is also known for his syndicated radio program, The Tim White Bluegrass Show, which recently aired a documentary he produced on Carolina Bible Camp. Tim White and Troublesome Hollow will tickle your ears and your funny bones on the CBC Front Porch Stage from 11:00 a.m. until 12 noon. 

Fireside Collective, the winner of the 2016 MerleFest Band Competition, is quickly gaining a reputation as a must-see progressive acoustic ensemble. Formed in 2014, this group of folk music enthusiast blend elements of traditional bluegrass and American roots music with modern acoustic arrangements. Their energetic show transitions smoothly between danceable bluegrass numbers and passionate folk ballads, with a surprise Paul Simon number thrown in for good measure. With Jesse Iaquinto on mandolin, Tommy Maher on dobro, Joe Cicero on acoustic guitar, and Carason White on upright bass, Fireside Collective brings a truly delightful exploration of roots music to the CBC Front Porch Stage from 1:45 p.m. until 2:45 p.m. 

The Loose Strings Band isn’t! This all-girl band from Galax, Virginia has tight arrangements and well-blended harmonies. Featured twice on the PBS program Song of the Mountains, they have completed no fewer than five albums. Known for their original compositions as well as top-notch covers of other artists’ work, the Loose Strings includes Ashley Nale (banjo), Channing Russell Combs (guitar), Grace Wilson Davis (bass), Lindsey Nale (mandolin), and Mary Claire Hooper (fiddle). Catch them on the CBC Front Porch Stage from 12:30 p.m. until 1:30 p.m. 

 Contact:

Lisa De Maio Brewer

Festival Director

SPCHWOMAN@aol.com

(cell) 336.262.6325

 

'They truly have unbreakable spirits' article from the Christian Chronicle

The parents of 'Kid President' Robby Novak and his sister, Lexi, share their journey of faith and foster adoption.

It's a life the couple would never trade, Laurie Novak said — a life God planned for them.  “If we can do it, anyone can,” she said. “God’s dreams are bigger than our dreams. We never could have imagined how much adoption would change our lives and how much we would be blessed by it.” Take a few minutes to read this wonderful story of faith and foster adoption. 

Source: http://www.christianchronicle.org/article/...