Giving Life: Father Receives Kidney From Adopted Daughter

Leah Tripp

dad and daughter.jpg

27 years ago, Billy Houze and his wife, Karen, adopted their daughter DeLauren McKnight from foster care, giving her a new family and a new life.

27 years later, McKnight is returning the gesture in a miraculous way: she’s saving her father’s life.

In 2016, Houze received the devastating news that his kidneys were failing. His prognosis was not favorable; if he didn’t receive a kidney transplant in five years, he wouldn’t survive.

The 64 year old pastor and father of five immediately began searching for matches within his own family, knowing that he may not live long enough to get moved up on the transplant list.

Houze’s biological sons were tested, to no avail. Three years passed with no match.

McKnight, who “never thought [she] would be a match because [she] was adopted,” decided to get tested just in case. On February 1, she received a life-changing call at work, confirming that she was a match and could donate her kidney to her father.

McKnight called her father right away, telling Good Morning America that she wanted him to be the first person who heard the news.

“I called and said ‘Daddy, I have to tell you something. I’m a match.’”

McKnight explains that the phone call with her father was very moving, saying that she was shaking as she told Houze she was a match.

“He stopped talking and he was crying...It was overwhelming”

Houze, who McKnight lovingly calls her Superman, says that he is immensely proud of his daughter.

“She told me, ‘Daddy, you thought you were saving my life pulling me from foster care but in actuality, you were saving my life so I could save yours later.’”

The father-daughter duo is expected to undergo the transplant surgery in the coming weeks, and are excited for the opportunity to live a happy, healthy life alongside one another and their family for years to come.

Introducing AGAPE's Newest Board Member

KAREN BLAKESLEE has joined AGAPE of NC’s Board of Directors this year! With more than 15 years working in the mortgage industry (and a career as a math teacher before that), Karen is currently Prime Lending’s Executive Vice President, East Division. She brings to her work with AGAPE valuable skills and talents in the areas of fundraising, budgeting & financial management; networking & public speaking; marketing & media; and strategic planning.

Karen Blakeslee Board of Directors

Karen Blakeslee Board of Directors

“Our happiness is greatest when we contribute most to the happiness of others.”

Karen says her career in the mortgage industry is “a natural fit for my passion for helping people develop their skills, discover their gifts and fulfill their potential.

She volunteers with the Raleigh Area Habitat for Humanity initiative and is active in the NC Food Bank organization. The mother of 6 kids, ranging in age from 18 to 28, Karen also plans to volunteer with AGAPE’s Young Adults Foster Home in Raleigh.

AGAPE Family to Open 2019 CBC Bluegrass Festival

By Lisa Brewer, Executive Director for the Festival

The 8th Annual Carolina Bible Camp Bluegrass Festival in Mocksville, NC is scheduled for Saturday, September 14, 2019!

We are excited that this year the CBC Bluegrass Festival will have a special guest opening the popular one-day event. An AGAPE of North Carolina family will be invited to lead the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance that morning!

For the 3rd year in a row, AGAPE of NC will also sponsor the Kids’ Activities tent, a covered 10-by-30-foot area featuring more than a dozen free supervised activities for young people, including old-fashioned sidewalk games, up cycled creative craft projects, Bible pages, and a free standing Kids Paint wall.

AGAPE of NC will have a separate vendor tent to provide information about the organization’s programs and services.

Unknown.jpg

“We are very thankful for the special relationship CBC has with AGAPE. Both Carolina Bible Camp and AGAPE are all about serving children and their families. The festival gives us an opportunity to join forces and serve together.”

~ CBC Board Member and Festival Chairman, Gregory J. Brewer

Artists appearing at this year’s CBC Bluegrass Festival include:

  • Grammy award winner, Dom Flemons {pictured}

  • Terry Baucom’s Dukes of Drive

  • The Kevin Prater Band

  • His & Hers

    Visit www.cbcbluegrass.com to purchase tickets for the
    CBC Bluegrass Festival or to participate as a sponsor or vendor.

    All profits from the Festival benefit the Carolina Bible Campcapital development and scholarship funds.

“We Focus on the Future”: A Conversation with Fay Evans

Leah Tripp

From the moment Fay Evans answers the phone, I can tell that I’m in for a blessing.

Her compassion and charisma is evident within the first few minutes of our conversation. When I ask her how long she’s been involved with helping young adults, she laughingly tells me of her daughter’s remark to her many years before:

“Mama, you’re always bringing someone else’s children home.”

Evans, who is currently the resident foster parent for AGAPE’s Young Adult Foster Home in Raleigh, tells me that she’s been working with teens in some capacity for most of her life. Whether it be through mentoring programs, church affiliation, or family connections, she’s always had a passion for helping young adults bridge the gap into adulthood.

A resident of Virginia for most of her life, Evans says that in 2005, God took her passion for young adults and used it in a new way- to have her to help and guide young women. Evans said the Lord called her to North Carolina, telling her to show young women His love through her own heart.

So Evans picked up her life and moved, a decision that she admits was easy to question at times.

Determined to discover God’s purpose for her, she began calling local foster care and adoption agencies. Some agencies didn’t get back to her, while others just didn’t feel like the right fit. Eventually, she found AGAPE of North Carolina.

“I kept seeing AGAPE, feeling like I needed to call... When I talked with Kim, we just had a connection, like we were both looking for each other.”

Evans’ partnership with AGAPE led to her being placed as the resident foster parent for AGAPE’s Young Adult Foster Home for women in Raleigh; an experience that Evans says is challenging, but rewarding.

She explains that caring for and guiding young adults is different because they have already formed their own opinions, personalities, and value systems. The process of learning each other’s likes, dislikes, and triggers has been a process, but it reaps reward as well.

“Days when you see them excited because they cooked a meal or filled out an application- those days make it worthwhile... If I can help one or two, I know my call is not in vain”

Her determination to guide young women has been a long time coming; she recounts the concern she felt when watching her niece, who was also a foster parent, work with young adults who were aging out of the system.

“I had never done foster care in my life, but I had the feeling those kids weren’t ready. They needed more tools, and they didn’t have them yet”

Evans Interview.jpg

That is Evans’ ultimate goal: to give her girls the love and the tools they need to create options for themselves. She tells me that she knows that they will make mistakes, but she wants them to have enough resources to be able to recover from those errors and try again.

Evans recognizes the importance of second chances in homes like hers. However, she tells me that the girls recognize the beauty of second chances as well.

“I’ve heard one or two say that they are so thankful for a new beginning.”

As our conversation comes to a close, I ask Evans how she’s seen the girls she’s worked with over the years grow and change. Her answer is simple, but poignant: they begin to think of their futures.

She explains that when the girls come into the home, they often have no clue what they want to do with their lives, but now, when she sits and talks with them, they have goals. They have hopes of college, of owning their own cars, of eventually having their own homes. They have hope that their lives can be in their own control.

“Around here, we talk some of the past, but we focus on the future.”

Share Your Story: An Opportunity for Foster Youth

Leah Tripp

Sharing stories is a vital part of building and finding community.

FosterClub, an organization that strives to provide foster children and youth with a network of peers and mentors, is currently holding a contest that is based on the powerful impact of storytelling.

The contest, called the “Creative Expression Contest,” is taking submissions from any youth under the age of 25 that has experienced foster care.

share your story.jpeg

The theme of the contest is “Finding Your People: How Foster Youth Connect.” Contestants are encouraged to focus their entries on the process of finding peers within foster care, the importance of connecting with others who have experienced the complexities of foster care, and how finding a community within the foster care system has equipped them to better serve those around them.

Submissions can be in any form of writing (essay, poem, etc), but must be under 500 words and written in English. While a trusted adult can help with the development of the submission, the content of the entry should be that of the contestant.

Entries for the Creative Expression Contest are due on April 30th, 2019. Each creator of a work that is published by FosterClub will receive a $25 Amazon gift card.

If you or someone you know has experienced foster care and would like to share their story via FosterClub’s contest, visit their site here for a more detailed list of entry guidelines.

Shop & Support

Shop for yourself and AGAPE on AmazonSmile.

0AA8C963-3DB2-491F-9D75-644F2AF9F89C.JPG

Here’s How:

  1.  Log in/Create an AmazonSmile Account.

  2.  Select “Association for Guidance Aid Placement and Empathy of NC Inc.”

  3.  View AGAPE’s charity list.

  4.  Add AGAPE items to your cart (along with your personal items).

  5.  At checkout, send the charity list items you’re purchasing to AGAPE’s shipping address.

jessica-wilson-1240705-unsplash.jpg

Supporting AGAPE via AmazonSmile provides necessary items for AGAPE’s NC based Young Adult Foster Home. Make a difference today by clicking the link below!

AGAPE thanks you for your support & encourages you to share our AmazonSmile program with friends and family!

https://agapeofnc.dm.networkforgood.com/emails/you-can-now-shop-for-agape-of-nc-on-amazonsmile

Summer Camps for Foster Children

Leah Tripp

Summer will be here before we know it, which means summer camp sign ups are approaching as well!

If you or someone you know are currently fostering a child, consider the following local camps who specialize in experiences that nurture spiritual, emotional, and social growth in a way that is specific to children in foster care.

fostercamp.jpeg

The Bridge Camp

The Bridge Camp is sponsored by Least of These Carolinas, and serves children 8-18 years old who are currently in foster care, or have exited foster care in the last year. The camp is held at Crowders Ridge in Gastonia, North Carolina, and runs for a week every summer. Registration is required to attend, and includes a $10 application fee.

The goal of The Bridge Camp is to provide foster children with a community of people who understand their situation, and to communicate the fact that children in foster care are not alone. The Bridge has trained counselors, as well as mentors who have aged out of the foster care system, and involves campers in outdoor activities, community building, and other traditional “camp” events.

To find out more about The Bridge Camp, visit this link:

https://lotcarolinas.com/programs-services/the-bridge-camp

Journey Camp

Journey Camp and Journey Junior Camp are programs sponsored by Under One Sky Village Foundation, an Asheville-based organization that provides children to children who have been or are currently in foster care.

The organization sponsors three camp weekends and one week-long overnight camp. Journey Camp serves foster children ages 11-17, while Journey Junior serves foster children ages 7-10.

Both Journey Camps include workshops for campers that allow them to learn new things, such as skills that will assist them in social and career situations. In addition, campers participate in talking circles, group discussion, team-building activities, recreational outings, and complete camp chores that teach responsibility and cooperation.

The camp lasts twelve days, and staff are highly trained counselors, along with camp mentors who have been through the foster care system. Journey Camp is held at Lutheridge Camp and Conference Center, while Journey Junior takes place at Black Mountain Children’s Home.

For more information on Journey and Journey Junior, visit the Under One Sky Village Foundation at https://www.under1sky.org/journey--junior-journey-camp.html

Royal Family KIDS

Royal Family KIDS sponsors camps for foster children ages 6-12 across the United States. These camps are sponsored by local churches and consist of a week-long camp experience that is focused on building self-esteem and healthy behaviors through a variety of activities, including hiking, sports, swimming, skits, and tea-parties.

The camp is focused on individuality, and has a 1:2 counselor-camper ratio. Churches, directors, and counselors go through intensive training to ensure that campers are in an environment that makes them feel safe and understood.

There are currently two Royal Family KIDS camps in Wake County, North Carolina: one is held at North Haven Chapel in Raleigh, while the other at Raleigh First Assembly Church.

To learn more about Royal Family KIDS, please visit their website here: https://rfk.org/camps/

Director's Update

Kimberly Scott

The past year has been a time resounding with evidence of God’s love, in deed and in truth!

During 2018, AGAPE was able to serve thirty-three foster families, license ten new foster homes, serve forty-six foster children & their families, serve six young adults and complete seven adoptions.

Screen Shot 2018-07-03 at 2.09.27 PM.png

Luke 6: 37-38 states: “Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For, with the measure you use, it will be measured back to you.”

We are profoundly grateful for the generosity in the hearts of AGAPE supporters from all over the state! YOU managed to fill the 3rd Annual CHANGE FOR LIFE campaign with generous acts of kindness — spiritually, physically, emotionally and financially.

1 John 3:16-18 states: “By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers. But if anyone has the world’s goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God’s love abide in him? Little children, let us not love in word or talk, but in deed and in truth.”

Finally, to sum it all up with thankfulness and gratefulness for God’s Blessings during the 3rd Annual CHANGE FOR LIFE campaign . . . YOUR open hearts led to the largest donation amount received during one of our CHANGE FOR LIFE campaigns – a total of $104,000 raised this past giving season!
Truly, AGAPE’s mission . . . YOUR mission is

“Strengthening Families One Child At A Time.”

Foster Care FAQs

Leah Tripp

As of 2017, there are 10,500 children in the North Carolina foster care system. This number has been steadily increasing over time, and the need for foster parents in North Carolina is evident.

If you or someone you know is interested in becoming a foster parent, AGAPE of North Carolina would love to help you begin that journey. Below are some frequently asked questions regarding foster parenting and AGAPE’s role in foster care.

1. What are AGAPE’s requirements for foster parenting?

  • Foster parents must be at least 21 years old

  • Foster parents must be in good health

  • Foster parents must be Christians

  • If married, foster parents must have been married for at least two years.

  •  Both parents are permitted to work outside the home.

  •  Foster parents can be single parents.

    2. What is the process for licensure?

    AGAPE abides by state regulations and agency guidelines to match children with foster families. Families who are interested in fostering will submit an application and will be contacted by a caseworker.

    The caseworker assigned to you and/or your family will begin the evaluation process, which will typically take about three months. This process will include interviews, home inspections, and background checks.

    At the end of the process, the caseworker will give your family guidelines regarding the number of children that can be in the home, the ages of the child(ren), and any specifications regarding gender or special needs.

    3. What children are in foster care?

    Most children in foster care have been removed temporarily from their homes due to a threat to their safety (i.e. abuse or neglect). Additionally, some children in foster care have been given to an adoption agency, and are in foster care during the legal process of terminating parental rights.

    The age range of children in foster care can span from newborn to 18 years old. Some children are placed individually, while others are part of a sibling group. The majority of foster children have experienced some type of physical and/or emotional trauma, and therefore are in need of a stable, loving environment, even if that home is temporary.

FAQs.jpeg

4. How long will the placement be?

The time spent in foster care varies from child to child. Some children are in care for a few days, while others are in care for years. The average AGAPE placement is in care for about eight months. During the licensing process, potential foster families will be able to discuss what placement lengths are preferred for them and their family.

5. How will I prepare to foster for the first time?

You will not be walking into your first placement unprepared. During the licensing process, potential foster parents will complete 30 hours of training that is specific to the age and situation of the child who will be placed.

After fostering begins, AGAPE staff is still on-call to help with any questions or concerns, and caseworkers will routinely be visiting and checking in with you and your family to provide guidance.

6. Is there financial compensation?

While foster parenting is a volunteer-based experience, AGAPE does provide reimbursement per month, per child to compensate for expenses directly related to the child and his or her care.

This reimbursement is meant to cover the basic needs of the child, and may change depending on age or situation (for example, older children may receive a clothing allowance). Additionally, foster families are not responsible for paying for the child’s medical expenses.

7. How do I get started?

If you, or someone you know is interested in foster care, contact AGAPE of NC at 919-673-7816, or visit our website at agapeofnc.org.

Your first meeting with AGAPE is not an obligatory commitment to foster care, and will consist of talking through information to figure out if fostering is right for you and your family.

We would love to hear from you!

Staff Spotlight: Kia Carter

Leah Tripp

Kia Carter is passionate about community.

As a social worker with AGAPE of North Carolina for a little over 2 years, Carter has seen just how important relationships, community, and connection are within foster families, but also within the agency itself.

Carter’s steadfast belief in the life-giving quality of community has led her to implement several initiatives, new to AGAPE this year, to nurture growth and connection among foster families.

One of these initiatives combines education and technology, as Carter is attempting to create an online study book for foster parents who are in the process of receiving their continuing education hours. Carter’s career as a social worker has shown her just how helpful support programs like this can be for busy families.

community.jpeg

“I know it can be hard to get the 10 hours that they need every year to continue their licensing, so I want to try and make it as convenient as I can with information that I know will be helpful for all of our foster parents.”

Carter also speaks to the importance of AGAPE’s quarterly connection gatherings as a means for foster families to support one another. These meetings allow foster parents within the agency to meet one another and share advice and encouragement. Carter explains that these meetings allow foster parents to support one another through challenges, and celebrate together in victories.

In addition to providing community for current foster families, these gatherings also give Carter hope for the future in terms of implementing a mentoring program for new foster parents. She explains that while she, as a social worker, can offer practical advice and experience, she realizes the value in hearing from someone who has truly been where you are.

“When you have someone who has gone before you and done what you are in the process of doing it is nice to have someone to talk to that gets it.”

While the concept of a mentoring program is still in the works, Carter explains that any program that creates community has its root in the gospel, and therefore, is worth creating and cultivating within an organization like AGAPE, which Carter says functions as a family in itself. AGAPE functions like a tight-knit family, and therefore seeks to create communities for those involved with its services.

Carter ends by sharing her ultimate motivation for her upcoming initiatives: her faith.

“Community is life-giving—and essential to following Christ. Scripture says that’s because we’re better together than we are alone.”

Christina Meredith Talks Foster Care on The Today Show

Leah Tripp

Christina Meredith.jpeg

Christina Meredith is a woman of many titles: college student, member of the U.S. Army, former Miss California, and most recently, a published author.

For many years, Meredith could also be identified by another title: “ward of the court.”

At age 16, Meredith was removed from the care of her mother and uncle, an environment that included a wide variety of abuse. Meredith was one of ten siblings, and after reporting the long-standing abuse to authorities, she was placed in foster care.

While being removed from her home spared Meredith from the abuse she had been enduring for years, she soon aged out of the foster care system, leaving her homeless and living out of her car. She was 18 years old.

Despite the obstacles life continued to throw her way, Meredith refused to give in. She drove across the country in her car that doubled as her home, and in a stroke of good fortune, was scouted to participate in the Miss California Competition. In 2013, she won the competition.

From that moment, Meredith decided to use her platform and determination to reform issues within the foster care system. And that’s exactly what she’s doing.

On March 5th, Meredith appeared on The Today Show, talking about her upcoming book, CinderGirl, but also speaking to the number of foster youth who age out of the system with little to no support, many of them becoming homeless, just as Meredith was.

Meredith called the situation a “travesty,” explaining that if every church in the U.S. committed to eradicating the issue of homeless foster youth, they could do it.

Her appearance on The Today Show serves as a call to action for the American people, especially faith-based organizations, to open their eyes to the need of young adults in the foster care situation. Further, Meredith’s story points to the fact that every life has value, and that no life is too far gone to be redeemed and restored.

Meredith’s interview can be viewed here:

https://www.today.com/video/homeless-as-a-teen-woman-calls-for-foster-care-system-reform-145229318 7540

Meredith’s memoir, CinderGirl hit shelves on March 5th.

Staff Spotlight: Mary Arnold, Director of Social Services

Leah Tripp

Screen Shot 2018-07-03 at 2.22.24 PM.png

On January 1st of 2019, Mary Arnold officially stepped into her new position as AGAPE of North Carolina’s Director of Social Services.

The position is new to AGAPE. Previously, the work done by a Director of Social Services was being carried out by Executive Director Kimberly Scott in addition to her responsibilities as director.

To delegate these responsibilities, Arnold, previously a social worker with AGAPE, began training in August to accept her upcoming role as Director of Social Services.

Arnold’s responsibilities include managing and directing AGAPE’s contracted social workers, facilitating intake of children from various counties, communicating with foster families regarding potential placements, keeping foster family files up to date, managing licenses, and being available to social workers if they need any assistance.

While Arnold admits this position has been a learning experience, her passion for the job and the people she works with is evident.

“I love it. I love being very personal and getting to know the all the social workers and so many families... I get to know them and talk with them”

In addition to working closely with social workers and families, Arnold also has a hand in deciding where a foster child should be placed, an aspect of her work that is new to this job.

Arnold explains that placing children is often a complex process; factors like age, location, family dynamics, and trauma history are all at play when she is making the decision of which family would best match a particular child.

“It’s like putting puzzle pieces together,” she remarks.

The job can be difficult, and Arnold does not shy away from this aspect of her position, explaining that getting placement calls and not being able to place children is one of the hardest parts of her job. She sees trauma and pain come through her email inbox regularly.

Despite this, Arnold says those heartbreaking emails and phone calls “remind me why I do what I do. It’s what makes me passionate about recruiting foster parents.”

This passion for children bleeds into Arnold’s personal life as well; she explains that her job has caused her and her husband to consider becoming foster parents, explaining that she cannot do the work she does and not take a moment to look at herself, to reflect on how she could be a potential solution to a problem.

When asked what she would tell potential foster parents who are afraid to take the first step into foster care, Arnold says:

“Trust in God. I know that’s so much easier to say than do... but there’s so much more reward when you take a leap of faith and go through the valleys... When you walk with these kids, when you are Jesus to them, when you come to the other side with them, you’re going to get the greatest reward.”

How Can My Church Serve Foster Children and Families?

Leah Tripp

While not everyone within a church will be called to be a full-time foster parent, there are other ways that your church can care for foster families and show Christ’s love to children in foster care. In addition to praying fervently for foster children and their families, churches can also serve in the following ways. 

Respite Care Teams

waysyourchurchcanserve.jpeg

Respite care providers are trained individuals who can offer babysitting services to full-time foster care parents. Respite care is important to the overall wellness of foster parents and their children, and provides a qualified, consistent support system for families. AGAPE of North Carolina offers training courses for respite parents. If someone in your church or small group is a full-time foster parent, consider supporting them through respite care. 

Mentoring

There are several programs in North Carolina and across the country that recruit mentors for older children and young adults in foster care. Mentors can make connections with foster youth and guide them in a variety of ways, including tutoring, job skills, college readiness, emotional wellness, and many other healthy lifestyle habits. Encourage your church family to serve foster children by signing up for a mentoring program. 

AGAPE of NC is licensing Young Adult Foster Homes that are in need of mentors from local congregations. To learn more about this opportunity, email Mary Arnold at marnold@agapeofnc.org. 

Care Packages

Care packages can be helpful for both foster children and potential foster families. There are a variety of organizations that sponsor care packages for children in care. Programs like Comfort Cases and Project Shoe Box provide care packages and/or suitcases with hygiene items, books, school supplies, and toys to children and youth in foster care. Churches can donate supplies and/or completed care packages to organizations such as these. 

Care packages can also be helpful for foster parents. Foster care placements can often come at short notice, which means new foster parents may be lacking in supplies for the child they just received. Consider having items like diapers, gift cards, and other necessities ready for any foster families in your community or congregation. 

The “Little Things” 

If there’s one thing I’ve heard consistently from my conversations with people involved in foster care, it’s that scheduling and time management can be really difficult. Foster parenting is a time commitment, which can make it easy for smaller tasks to fall to the wayside. If you know someone who is a foster parent, offer to bring them a hot meal, cut their grass, or pick up their groceries. Small acts of kindness go a long way, and there’s no telling how grateful someone will be to have the “little things” taken care of. 



What Happens After 18?: Aging Out of Foster Care

Leah Tripp

I remember the excitement I felt leading up to March of 2016.

I was turning 18, and I felt like I had the whole world in front of me. I was a senior in high school, I knew where I was going to college, and I felt like I had plenty of options open to me as I moved forward into legal “adulthood.”

18th birthdays should be full of promise and expectation, but for many young adults in America, turning 18 marks a time of great uncertainty.

Each year, over 23,000 children age out of the US foster care system.

Aging out of foster care can be traumatic for a variety of reasons. From a logistical standpoint, many children who age out of foster care become effectively homeless the day they turn 18 if they do not have a support system that is willing to provide them care and housing. According to the National Foster Youth Institute, homelessness impacts 20% of youth who age out of foster care.

What Happens After 18?.jpeg

For those who avoid the immediate threat of homelessness, there are a range of other obstacles related to employment, education, and emotional health.

Youth who age out of foster care go to college at a significantly lower rate, as they may not have adults who are willing to guide them through application processes, academic requirements, and required testing.

Their lack of participation in post-secondary education is not due to lack of ability, but to lack of awareness.

In terms of employment, 50% of foster children who age out of the system will have gainful employment by the age of 24. Statistically, the other half of these youth will struggle to maintain stable jobs. The lack of consistent employment can contribute to cyclic patterns that keep foster youth from being able to own their own homes, pursue educational opportunities, or achieve career advancements.

Ultimately, foster youth are in great need of those willing to guide them, care for them, and invest in their lives and growth.

This care can come in the form of full-time foster parenting, mentoring, respite care, or volunteering.

Many Young Adult Foster Homes are beginning to address the challenges associated with aging out by providing care and guidance to foster youth ages 18-21.

These homes allow those who have technically “aged out” to have time to develop necessary skills and a support system in a familial setting.

If you are interested in learning more about helping foster youth, or about Young Adult Foster Homes, visit agapeofnc.org

Opening the Door: Young Adult Foster Homes

Leah Tripp

A home in Raleigh, North Carolina is seeking to meet a need that many do not realize exists within foster care: young adult foster homes. 

Mary Arnold, Director of Social Services for AGAPE of North Carolina, explained that while many people associate foster care with a 0-17 age bracket, they often “do not realize that there are 18 to 21 year olds in care that need a home as well.” 

The home in Raleigh seeks to meet this need by providing a foster home for 18-21 year old girls, hoping to give them stability and a jumping off point from which to pursue personal, educational, and career goals. 

AGAPE Arnold.jpeg

Currently, the home consists of a foster mother and two young women. Arnold makes monthly visits to the home, checking in with the girls and their foster mother. These visits consist of talking to the girls about various aspects of their lives, including schooling, employment, social adjustment, and the living situation within the house. 

While the house is technically a foster home, Arnold acknowledges that the day-to-day functioning of the home works differently since the residents are adults. Unlike younger foster children, the girls have the option choose this foster home. They have chosen to commit to living in the home, understanding that they have the freedom to “pack their bags and go.”

One of the most interesting aspects of young adult foster homes lies in the mutual investment of both parties; Arnold explains that girls can, and have, interviewed the foster mother and the managing foster care agency in order to determine whether or not the home is the right fit. The foster mother also has the opportunity to interview the girls as well, creating a mutual relationship of interest and understanding. 

Arnold also explains that the need for any and all foster parents is also growing, explaining that she has received quite a few calls regarding children as of late that she has not been able to accept or place due to the lack of available foster homes. 

Finally, when asked what she wants people to understand about young adults in foster care, Arnold states:

“They have so much to give. They are full of love, but they have been hurt, so there’s not a lot of trust there at first. But once you open the door to them, they have so much to give that it is endless. We need to support them so they can be the people that God created them to be.” 

ReMoved Part 3- Love is Never Wasted

The ReMoved films are produced by Nathanael & Christina Matanick, co-directed by Nathanael Matanickand Tony Cruz, and written by Christina Matanick. 

Little Kevi is torn from the only life he has ever known and struggles to make sense of how he fits between two worlds and two mothers. The 3rd in the ReMoved Series.

We all fell in love with Zoe from ReMoved 1 & 2. Now they tell a different story - to capture a broader range of the foster care experience.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fegRjSgRYX...

Young Adult Foster Homes

By Mary Arnold

We are committed to providing these young women with the support they need to assist them in becoming the independent, strong women that God created them to be (Psalm 139:13).

Have you ever wondered what happens to teens when they turn 18 and “age out” of the foster care system?
The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 provided a provision that allows states to receive federal money for programs associated with supporting young adults who choose to remain in foster care up to the age of 21. North Carolina is one of 25 states to extend foster care beyond 18 years of age.

AGAPE of NC opened Young Adult Foster Homes in October of this year for young ladies aged 18-21. We are committed to providing these young women with the support they need to assist them in becoming the independent, strong women that God created them to be (Psalm 139:13).

jessica-wilson-1240705-unsplash.jpg

The young ladies will all be working on different goals while residing at Young Adult Foster Homes. Some will be finishing up high school. Others will be going to college or working to save money to buy a car or rent their own place to live.

Ms. Fay Evans, who has a passion for helping young women and assisting them with the transition to the next phase of their lives, is our resident Foster Parent for our Young Adult Foster Homes located in Raleigh. Ms. Evans has worked with teen girls for over 20 years. She prays for each girl daily -- those who are in her care and those who will be coming into her care. She prays for God’s direction and wisdom in leading the young ladies toward independence.

AGAPE needs additional women volunteers for Young Adult Foster Homes. Ms. Evans will need respite care providers for the home, and we would also like to have mentors from congregations in the area for each young girl. If you have an interest in volunteering at Young Adult Foster Homes please contact Mary Arnold by email at: marnold@agapeofnc.org or by phone at: 919.673.7816.